Use Facebook to target Boomers, seniors

thought

Surprisingly, maintaining a Facebook Page may now be even more important for organizations targeting Boomers compared to those reaching youth.

Social media trends strongly suggest that big platforms like Facebook and Twitter are being abandoned by folks under age 35.

I recommend an excellent study by Assistant Professor of Digital Communication and Social Media at Cabrini College in Pennsylvania. (And thanks to a colleague for passing the info on to me.) In her short essay, she mentions that Time magazine recently reported over 11 million kids have left Facebook since 2011.

Duncan says, “Many younger people are logging into Facebook simply to see what others are posting, rather than creating content of their own. Their photos, updates, likes and dislikes are increasingly shared only in closed gardens like group chat and Snapchat.”

One reason young folks are leaving big platforms? Such social media sites have  gone mainstream. (For example, kids don’t necessarily wish to share their Friday night activities with mom, aunts and grandma!) Almost half of those over 65 who use the Internet now have a Facebook account according to a recent Pew study. In other words: Facebook stopped being cool a long while ago.

When a business wants to target Boomers and older consumers, the online strategy and content need to be driven by a content writer who understands this cohort and hangs out on social media like they do.

Why Pope Francis should stop Tweeting this Christmas

Pope frances

Christmas is around the corner so this is as good a time as any to urge Pope Francis to close down his Twitter account.

Pope Francis has been praised for engaging his followers on social media. His Twitter account has gained 8.15M English language followers since early 2012. The Holy See “follows” nobody (makes sense, I suppose); his eight ‘followers’ are duplicate Twitter feeds in different languages such as Arabic, Polish, Spanish and German with a combined following of an additional 12M.

It sounds revolutionary. The most ordinary individuals can now get access to personal, inspirational messages from the most prominent Christian in the world at any time, at any place.

For example, during the Paris attacks last month, the Holy See tweeted, “I’m deeply saddened by the terrorist attacks in Paris. Please join me in prayer for the victims and their families #PrayersforParis.” The Tweet was liked 65K times and re-tweeted 40K times.

This is what celebrity Katy Perry told the world: “Guys, it’s time to #PrayforParis right now.” She outperformed the Holy Father. Her 79M followers re-tweeted the message 49K times and 63K liked it.

And that’s the rub. Although @pontifex may make the Pope seem  accessible, he is more likely diluting his personal brand.

Just imagine scrolling through an average Twitter feed:

  • Justin Bieber: @whoisvers Why is this Justin Bieber album so fucking amazing
  • Eminem: I’m ready for war, got machetes and swords… #ShadyWars
  • CNN: Dashing through the snow In a one horse open sleigh O’er the Capitol Hill fields we go http://cnn.it/1maAE1o
  • Pope Francis: One goal for each day: to convey the tenderness of Christ to those who are most in need.

Really?

Accessibility is good, but not at the expense of erasing important differences in status, authority and influence. No matter what one may think about the Catholic Church or the Pope, he is not on equal footing with celebrities and 24-hour TV channels. At least I don’t hope so. This Christmas, let’s stop pretending.

Should you trust PM Harper’s Twitter account?

Harper TweetIs Conservative Leader Stephen Harper  still trying to suggest he is personally managing his Twitter account? And is it appropriate for @pmharper to stuff our news feed with Conservative propaganda during an election campaign?

Justin Trudeau’s Twitter account clearly states it is run by the Liberal Leader himself and campaign staff. Thomas Mulcair is rather blunt about the matter: “Account run by .”  Green Party’s Elizabeth May explains her Tweets are her own “unless signed by Hill Staff.”

I wrote about Mr. Harper’s Twitter feed earlier this year, asking a few simple questions: Where was Prime Minister Stephen Harper on June 10th?

And what was he doing, exactly?

Apparently, he was getting briefed on Black Sea Operations. He let his 815K followers know about it on Twitter.

First, does the Prime Minister really want us to believe that he is personally Tweeting while being briefed on military matters? Let’s just say: I hope not.

Indeed, let’s assume a PR staffer can post on behalf of our Prime Minister — using his picture and official Twitter handle.

This seems to raise some security questions. First, how many staffers have access to the PM’s account? Second, is the PM really aware of the content being posted on his behalf almost constantly? How long would it take him (or staff) to learn about a fraudulent post?

Are Canadians asked to trust this information distributed by Mr. Harper?

Or are we collectively asked to accept that Mr. Harper’s Twitter account is just a PR ploy? I suggest our trust in all information distributed by our Prime Minister may be undermined when it’s entirely obvious he isn’t personally sending this information to us.

Likewise the credibility of corporation, non-profit or professional services firm may be undermined by its Twitter account.

Often, organizations delegate the production of social media content to communication departments. Indeed, senior leaders have more urgent matters to attend to most of the time. A major law firm recently sent the following Tweets to its followers: “Just received a package from one of our favs, @CLEBC!” Or what about this one: “Appreciate my job/colleagues more & more now!” Another firm wants its followers to know one of its lawyers is interviewed by several media outlets. Are these organizations expecting their clients to care about these trivial matters?

Twitter can be used to help an organization share relevant news instantly and build brand. However, the platform’s instant, quirky nature and the inability to pull back information can likely harm an organization’s reputation more quickly than other media platforms. Moreover, organizations who delegate the production of social media content on behalf of their senior staff may need to review how this could impact credibility.

So, what were you doing on June 15th? Reading your Twitter news feed?